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520 Superior Ave, Suite 320
Newport Beach, CA 92663
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CONDITIONS & PROCEDURES
CONDITIONS WE TREAT:​​

  • Colon Cancer Screening: This is one of the most important medical decisions you can make. Often people have no symptoms until the disease has progressed. It is recommended to get screened by age 50, or sooner if you are at high risk.

  • Acid Reflux Disease: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) occurs when stomach acid flows back into the oesophagus. This common condition can create oesophagal burning or heartburn, chest pain, difficulty swallowing, the sensation of a lump in your throat or regurgitation of food or sour liquid.

  • Barrett’s Esophagus: This condition if marked by the abnormal condition of the oesophagal lining, becoming more like the lining of the small intestine. This can be a condition from long-standing GERD. This condition can only be determined by performing an endoscopy (a thin, flexible device to look inside the body. Barrett’s Esophagus has a significantly higher risk of developing oesophagal cancer.

  • Gastritis/Ulcers: Gastritis is an inflammation or irritation of the lining of the stomach. Symptoms of gastritis can include nausea, abdominal bloating or pain, indigestion or loss of appetite. Ulcers can affect the stomach and small intestines. They are caused when the thick layer of mucus that protects the stomach from digestive juices is reduced and allows the digestive acids to eat away at the tissue that lines the stomach. Symptoms of ulcers can be a dull pain in the stomach, weight loss, nausea or vomiting, bloating acid reflux and anaemia.

  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a disorder that affects the large intestine. Symptoms include abdominal pain accompanied by diarrhea, constipation or alternating episodes of both. There is no cure for IBS but there are ways to improve the symptoms.

  • Celiac Disease: Celiac Disease is an autoimmune disease. People with this disease cannot eat gluten because it will damage their small intestine, which leads to nutrients not being absorbed properly into the body. Adults with Celiac Disease often don’t have digestive symptoms but can have anemia, fatigue, bone or joint pain, arthritis and many other symptoms.

  • Gallstone disease: Gallstones are hardened deposits of digestive fluid that form in the gallbladder. The gallbladder holds digestive fluid called bile that is released into the small intestine via the bile duct. If the bile duct gets obstructed by a gallstone the symptoms can include sudden and intensifying pain in the abdomen, right shoulder and nausea and vomiting.

  • Constipation: Constipation is one of the most common digestive problems in the United States, affecting around 2.5 million people. It occurs when bowel movements become less frequent and stools become difficult to pass and it can cause abdominal bloating.

  • Gastritis/Ulcers/H-Pylori: Gastritis is an inflammation or irritation of the lining of the stomach. Symptoms of gastritis can include nausea, abdominal bloating or pain, indigestion or loss of appetite. Ulcers can affect the stomach and small intestines. They are caused when the thick layer of mucus that protects the stomach from digestive juices is reduced allowing the digestive acids to eat away at the tissue that lines the stomach. Symptoms of ulcers can be a dull pain in the stomach, weight loss, nausea or vomiting, bloating, acid reflux anemia. Most ulcers are caused by bacteria called Helicobacter pylori (H-pylori). Both the acid and bacteria irritate the lining and cause an ulcer to form. If left untreated, H-pylori infection can cause gastritis.

  • Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis: Diverticula are small pouches that bulge outward through the colon or large intestine. If you have these pouches, you have a condition called diverticulosis. It becomes more common as people age. Most people who have diverticulosis don’t show any signs. Those who do might have belly pain or cramping, bloating, constipation or diarrhea.
    If the pouches become inflamed or infected, you have a condition called diverticulitis. The symptoms of diverticulitis include pain, which may be constant and persist for several days. The lower left side of the abdomen is the usual site of the pain. You can have nausea and vomiting, fever, abdominal tenderness, constipation or, less commonly, diarrhea.

  • Dysphagia (difficulty swallowing): Dysphagia is the medical term used to describe difficulty swallowing. Dysphagia includes difficulty starting a swallow (called oropharyngeal dysphagia) and the sensation of food being stuck in the neck or chest (called oesophagal dysphagia). Other symptoms include drooling, being hoarse, bringing food back up, frequent heartburn, unexpectedly losing weight, coughing or gagging when swallowing.
    Occasional difficulty swallowing, which may occur when you eat too fast or don't chew your food well enough, usually isn't cause for concern. But persistent dysphagia may indicate a serious medical condition requiring treatment.

  • Abdominal Pain: Abdominal pain can be caused by many conditions. However, the main causes are an infection, abnormal growths, inflammation, obstruction (blockage), and intestinal disorders. Infections in the throat, intestines, and blood can cause bacteria to enter your digestive tract, resulting in abdominal pain.

Learn About EGD
Upper endoscopy lets your doctor examine the lining of the upper part of your gastrointestinal tract, which includes the esophagus, stomach and duodenum (first portion of the small intestine). Your doctor will use a thin, flexible tube called an endoscope, which has its own lens and light source and will view the images on a video monitor. You might hear your doctor or other medical staff refer to upper endoscopy as upper GI endoscopy, esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) or panendoscopy. 
Learn About Colonoscopy
Colonoscopy is a common and very safe procedure that examines the lining of the lower intestinal tract called the colon or large intestine.  When used as a colon cancer prevention method, colonoscopy can find potentially precancerous growths called polyps and remove them before they turn into cancer. This explains why colonoscopy is an invaluable tool that helps your doctor answer important questions about your digestive health and prevent certain diseases like colon cancer.